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Club News, 17th April

Club News, 17th April

The weekend was really busy with members competing internationally, locally and for charity:

European Sprint Duathalon Championships in Kalkar, Germany

Lucy Williams was extremely pleased to place 6th in her age group in the Sprint Duathalon (5km run 20km bike and 2.5km run). The event has a spectacular setting alongside the River Rhine and within the grounds of Wunderland Kalkar. Lucy commented that the event was awesome and she had surpassed all her expectations with the performance of her life so far (1.11.36) and this had really given her something to build on for the World Championships at Aviles in northern Spain in June.

Club Duathalon at Ardingly Reservoir raising funds for Chailey Heritage Foundation

The main club event was a Duathalon at Ardingly Reservoir with entry fees being donated to the Seymour Department at Chailey Heritage Foundation for their Activity Week. This raised about £250.

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Twenty three members turned out on a sunny Sunday morning for this very enjoyable club event which had options for a Short Course of 5km run, 15mile bike 2.5km run or the Standard Course of 10km run 25mile bike and 5km run.
Twelve members chose the Short Course with George Murray coming home 1st in 1.23.53 and Mike Jaffe second in 1.26.35 in the men's section and Emma Jaffe 1.45.42 and Sarah Hinton claiming the top places in the women's section. The occasion was quite a family affair with five family teams taking part.

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Brighton Marathon

Ten other members chose to do the Brighton Marathon. In the men's section Jim Graham was very pleased to record 2.51.49 giving him 32nd place overall and 6th place in his age group. Edward Cockill was delighted with 3.36 in his first marathon, and Doug MacTaggart felt comfortable with 3.53. Jim said he really enjoyed the run, got stronger during the race and felt good afterwards. Jim is in training for the Ironman World Championships in Hawaii in October, whilst Doug is training for the Comrades Marathon in South Africa at the end of May. This nearly 90km race starts in Pietermaritzburg and finishes in Durban. Doug is also competing in a couple of Ironmans later in the year. Peter Barnaby 3.46, and Simon Hodges 4.32 also competed. In the women's section Kate McTear came 42nd on 3.22.12, Nicola Cowles placed well on 4.37 with Amanda Durrant on 5.00, Kay Mcmenamin on 5.01 and Emma Smith on 5.54.

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Windsor & Eton Duathalon

On Saturday Tony Asquith competed in the Standard Distance Duathalon (10km bike 40km bike 5km run) at the popular Olympic Rowing Centre at Dorney Lake recording 3.01. This is a flat course held on completely closed roads providing a safe environment. Tony commented that it was a really nice, traffic free event although the weather was poor. He is therefore looking forward to trying the event again in better weather.

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Goodwood Duathlon 2016

Goodwood Duathlon 2016

Sunday 3rd April dawned sporting light winds and sunny spells, meaning that the notoriously windy Goodwood circuit would at worst be breezy, rather than the knock-you-off-your-bike gales that had been endured in recent years. This was particularly pleasing as I'd forgotten just how tough a duathlon is and had optimistically chosen the long course to complete. (I thought: it's only a couple of quid more, so why not??). Also, having previously completed an event at Brands Hatch, where the smooth, wide tarmac was a pleasure to ride on, I fancied racing on another closed circuit. There were a large handful of MSTC members who had also chosen Goodwood as their seasons opening race, split between the two race options of 4,20,4 and 4,40,8 (Kms).

Cliché alert!

It's hard to avoid them when you turn up at Goodwood: It really was glorious in the spring sunshine. As you emerge trackside from the narrow entry tunnel, the area was as clean as a whistle and the art deco buildings made you feel like you had stepped back in time. Parking is a stone's throw from transition, there is plenty of spectator viewing space and a small pop up cafe, selling those treats to be avoided as you try get down to race weight. The relaxed gun time of 10 am and Goodwood's proximity makes it a very good venue for family and friends support.

Children's entertainment

This chap turned up in true Goodwood fashion, having painted his three-wheeler in MSTC colours. It reminded me of a visit to Jerry Cottles circus, I imagined seeing  'Clumsy the cycling clown'  wobbling around registration on a unicycle whilst juggling a pump, a water bottle and a banana!

The Race.

Simplicity itself: Mass start on the track, run a lap, T1 (in the pit lane), ride 5 laps (20km) or 10 (40 km), T2, run another lap (or 2).

Reality bit on lap 1 as a group of 9 set off like greyhounds after a stuffed bunny, disappearing into the distance: duathlon is an aquaphobic's sport. I took in the views, looking up to Goodwood race course and across the flatlands towards the Witterings, as the first circuit was completed.

The bike was fast, with only a short section of the lap into a stiff breeze: It was very enjoyable to race flat out, unconcerned about potholes, road furniture and sleepy eyed Sunday drivers on their way to brunch. Even still I was lapped by a few of the greyhounds I'd last seen on the run and Colin C gave me a cheery "C'mon Phil!" as he also whizzed by.

The second run was a different story. On dismounting and attempting to jog through transition, my glutes were in knots and I realised I'd overcooked it. Hobbling back out on to the track, I looked like a man who was "in a hurry after a curry"… Thankfully this eased off and I pressed on, ever conscious that my legs were pretty shot, but I could see I wasn't the only one suffering: the first race of the season is always a loud wakeup call!  The end of the two laps came along relatively quickly, 8km seeming much shorter than the 10 covered in a STD distance Tri. I was relieved it was over and happy that I'd completed my first race of the season, ticking off several goals: another event on a closed circuit, a distance PB for an hour's ride and a sub 1.55 finish. Time to head to the cafe and treat myself to a post-race feed!

Full results here: http://www.portsmouthtriathletes.co.uk/results/2016/163-goodwood-2016.html

 

 

 

BAR 2015 Race 1 - Duathlon

BAR 2015 Race 1 - Duathlon

ARDINGLY Reservoir Sunday 3rd May 2015

Considering the conditions we had an amazing record turnout for the first Best All Rounder race of 2015. 21 competitors took on the course at Ardingly, 16 for the short course and 5 for the long course.

But first I must offer huge thanks to my marshals, who happily gave up their Sunday morning to stand or sit in driving rain and gusting winds to make sure the rest of us had a good race. Loz and Tim did the timekeeping, Pete Harris directed everyone onto College Road and Mark Jordan and Emma Alden made sure no-one went wrong on the run course. Dean Allen, Jason Cole and David Ricketts (before going on to do the Haywards Heath marathon weekend day 2) dropped by to cheer everyone on.

It is fair to say that this was not going to be a day for PBs. Most people know the run course and it is what I would term as semi-cross country. It is a rough path interspersed with mud and large puddles, with gates and dead turns. As expected James Dear shot off, with Barry not far behind, with Liane trying hard to keep him in her sights. Both Mike Jaffe and Jim and Helen Graham had run the London Marathon just 7 days ago so they were all a bit jaded on the run but still posted highly respectable times for the conditions.

The bike course is always fairly hard as it is quite undulating, alright - hilly. With the added interest of gusty cross winds, driving rain, recently dressed roads with loose gravel in abundance and a healthy increase in the number of potholes, the course was positively challenging. Apart from James blitzing the course in 44 minutes, and Barry in 52 minutes, the most impressive ride came from Lucy with a sub 58 minute split on her training bike. Jim Graham unfortunately went wrong at the Dukes Head roundabout, not because he didn't know the course, but being tired, with steamed up glasses, in awful conditions just led to an error. At least he could finish though. It wasn't the same for Kevin James. He had ridden over to the start and was a bit cold before the race started, but was just getting into his stride on the bike when a broken wheel spoke ended his race.

The second run was understandably slower paced. The conditions were taking their toll, although 4 athletes managed the 5.2km run in under 12 minutes, Barry, James, Liane and Jo. It was good to see some more recent members racing - so well done to Jo, as well as Paul and Sam who ran the race as a relay. It was also great to see another step in Brad's multisport comeback, following years of foot trouble with some quite fast running and the 3rd fastest bike split.

There are 2 people who deserve specific mentions for fantastic efforts in their respective races. First is Helen Graham. After beating Margaret Hollamby's club marathon record (held since 2008) last week, she came to race the duathlon having virtually not touched her bike for years. With no bike fitness and a lack of bike handling skills, this was a seriously tough thing to attempt, but she just didn't give up and earned a huge cheer when she finished.

Second special mention must go to Jean Fish. She was the only female athlete to attempt the long course, but like Helen, she just stuck at it. When she came through T2, Loz ran the final 5k with her, and I believe the rain finally stopped and she finished to rousing cheers.

The biggest winner from today's race is the club spirit. I know that I felt really part of a group all pulling together and supporting each other and welcoming athletes of all abilities, and overcoming tough conditions. On top of that we raised more than £250 for the club charity which is quite impressive. Everyone was cheerful and positive throughout, and a special mention for extended cheerfulness must go to the tea lady at the sailing centre afterwards!

The results are available on the Duathlon event page.

Southwater Duathlon

In the end 9 hardy souls took part, 2 for the short course and 7 for the long.  At the off, Phil Couch was initially quickest, but Neil then reeled him in and went on to run 38.17 for the 10k, which was very impressive as it was quite wet and slippery and muddy in places. Jim Graham was next through in 40.56.

Phil was doing the short course as he is just getting fit again and completed 5k in 19.24. Rachel and Lucy were running at the same pace, but Lucy was doing 5k (23.26) and Rachel 10k (47.12).  It was great to see Jeff back racing again. 47.38 for 10k may have been the slowest on the day, but is still a respectable stand alone time for this sort of course.

The times will show that Jim had the fastest T1, but it was one of the most bizarre transitions ever. He reached the mount point still wearing his trainers then proceeded to change into his bike shoes and dumping the trainers with Helen who was marshaling there. Phil is the man to watch in T1, because he is so quick you might miss him - very slick!
John MacTear learnt from last year's error and got out of T1 without a hitch this time. Lucy took the most leisurely approach but getting the right number of layers on for a cold bike leg was the key to survival.

The bike course was modified from last year due to roadworks. However it is much easier to navigate and nobody went wrong, although the excellent marshaling form Helen, Gordon and Andy as well as Sharon on the run course guaranteed it. Neil is clearly on top form at the moment because sub 64 minutes on a cold wet and windy day was awesome. Most people were slower than their usual but the weather did get worse once the rain
started and the wind picked up, especially on the return leg of the lap. If you look at the results you will see that there were no bad times - everyone did so well in the conditions.

T2 is always interesting.    Phil again showed what is possible, with an astonishing 20 second split. Ant looked like he had a good T2, but not before he came in the out way, and then had to go back out and round to the proper dismount at the car park entrance. Luckily we weren't penalising anyone for transition aberrations. Rob took both his transitions (and most of the race) at a laid back pace, he always looked like he had loads left in the tank.

Most people ran the last 5k at a slightly slower pace than the first 10k, but Neil still managed sub 20 minutes and it was Rob with the second fastest time in 21.30, although again no-one was slow. Phil managed 10.15 for his last 2.5k for a very fast overall performance in the sprint race, and Lucy again ran strongly with a 12.06 lap.

Prize for the most cheerful athlete must go to John for insisting on enjoying himself all the way round whilst still making a huge effort and racing extremely well.

Thank you again to all the marshals, Sharon Chladek, Helen Graham, Gordon Skeats, Andy Jenkins and Hazel Tuppen. Everyone appreciated all of your efforts and support. Special thanks go to Hazel for bringing her homemade chocolate covered flapjacks - they were absolutely delicious!!


It was also nice to Mike and Emma Jaffe coming out of their way on a long run to cheer everybody on.

 

LONG MEN

Neil Giles        38.17   1.20   1.03.58   0.53   19.40   2.04.08  10pts       0%
Jim Graham    40.56   0.56   1.09.53   0.57   22.51   2.15.33    9         9.2
Rob Hoodless  42.30   2.22   1.12.11   1.52   21.33   2.20.28    8        13.16
Ant Grey         44.43   1.23   1.13.54   0.53   24.09   2.25.02    7        16.84
John MacTear  43.56   1.23   1.16.44   1.04   23.57   2.27.04    6        18.48
Jeff Woodall    47.38   2.02   1.16.53   0.59   25.36   2.33.08    5        23.36

Women
Rachel Baker   47.12   2.20   1.15.23   0.59   26.44   2.30.43   10        0%

SHORT MEN
Phil Couch     19.24   1.00   0.35.45   0.20   10.15   1.06.41   4pts

Women
Lucy Williams  23.26   2.52   0.44.53   1.23   12.06   1.24.40   9pts

 

Castle Coombe Chilly Duathlon

Castle Coombe Chilly Duathlon

Wednesday evening found me looking at the BBC weather forecast for Sunday, trying to decide whether to do the Castle Coombe Chilly Duathlon as a season opener. The weather looked cold, dry, and windy, but no rain was forecast in the meantime so that was good. Then I checked the list of entries to date, and there was the name of the guy who beat me by 6 seconds on my first race, and whom I beat by 2 seconds last time. Decision made - I had to race and beat him properly. 

Now I have nothing against the chap - I barely know him - but I needed to get my season off to a good start, and beating a "rival" seemed like a good idea. There were a couple of minor flaws in my plan, including the fact I had not prepared specifically for the race, the bike was still on the turbo trainer, I hadn't practiced transitions since September, on-line entries were closed, the race is four days away and I am not at home for three of them. Minor details. 

Saturday comes and I decided I had better get the bike ready and do a quick run. The bike prep was fairly simple, and I even managed to change the tyre without puncturing the inner tube (a rare success). My run however had felt a bit slow and sluggish recently so off I went to put in a quick couple of miles to prove I still had it. A short while later (and a new mile PB to give me hope) I felt ready - I had even managed to come up with the innovation of using elastic bands to stop the icy cold wind whistling up my non elasticated sleeves. Genius 

Sunday morning comes with a civilised 10:30am registration. Bike racked, multiple pit stops (too much hydration), race briefing, say hello to the rival, and it's off to the start line. Off goes the gun, and unlike last year I set off at my pace - not that of the racing snakes near the front. Halfway through the first lap the girl next to me started beeping and confirmed that we had reached one mile in a respectable 7:10. My rival had dropped back at the 1km mark so I knew all was going well. 

Into T1 at 14:25 and what followed can only be described as a case study in why you should practice your transition - I did not and 1:25 later I finally emerged on my bike, Doh. 

Five laps of Castle Coombe racetrack follow without incident, but I was now frozen due to the 0 deg 13mph wind. Into the final straight heading towards T2 and I managed to get my feet on top of my shoes for a fast exit off the bike - that at least worked and we quickly rack the bike and get the trainers back on. It rapidly became apparent that I need to do more bike-run transitions as "gazelle" was the antithesis of my running style at that point. 

My wife was by the T2 exit and I shouted a query about my rival - "he's right behind you, cane it" she yells - off I went like a startled sloth. My wife's yell started to haunt me and I got my legs going a bit faster. 

I noticed a few runners a couple of hundred yards ahead of me, and having ignored the two runners zipping past, I realised that I was actually catching them. At the 1.5mile mark I caught them, and at a useful hairpin on the run course I looked back to see where my rival was. He was nowhere to be seen and my wife was confirmed as being a lying toe-rag who should not be trusted for race advice. 

The final half mile passed without drama and a quick sprint took me to the finish line. 

Negative split on Run 2 v Run 1, all bike laps within 3 seconds of each other, 87th overall compared to 164th last year, a new PB of 58:25 for the race, and more importantly I beat my rival by 6 minutes (!!!). Happy, happy days. 

My wife pleaded guilty to perverting the course of injustice, and was sentenced to an afternoon of repeated second by second analysis of the race without chance of parole.

 

Andrew Lennox